email print share on Facebook share on Twitter share on reddit pin on Pinterest

WATCH ON CINEUROPA

Watch on Cineuropa: Women behind the camera

by 

- For the first instalment in our Watch on Cineuropa series, here’s a selection of some outstanding films directed by women that will help you sweeten your quarantine

Watch on Cineuropa: Women behind the camera
Eden by Mia Hansen-Løve

Notwithstanding the changes ushered in by the #MeToo movement, the number of women directors working today remains appallingly low. While the film industry struggles to address issues of representation in front and behind the camera, we’re proud to present a few gems from established and emerging women cineastes for you to watch and enjoy on our pages.

These titles are brought to you in partnership with eyelet (read news), a streaming platform designed to give cinephiles around the world access to the very best in independent cinema. In conjunction with eyelet, we are now able to showcase films we’ve been reviewing over the years - titles you can stream and read about on Cineuropa.

(The article continues below - Commercial information)

For the first instalment in our Watch on Cineuropa series, here’s a selection of some outstanding films that will help you sweeten your quarantine. Enjoy, and stay tuned for the new movies coming your way soon.

Eden [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Charles Gillibert
interview: Mia Hansen-Løve
film profile
]

Co-written with her brother and former DJ Sven, Mia Hansen-Løve’s stupefying and electric Eden unspools as a kind of ethnography of 1990s French club life, chronicling a few years in the life of a Parisian DJ on his quest to fame. And yet, for all its intoxicating cocktail of drugs and timeless tunes (courtesy of Daft Punk, who also grace the screen as the hero’s pals), this remains a profoundly melancholic tale. Hardly a rags-to-riches, and more a moving, shattering take on the interplay between reality and fantasy on one’s road to maturity.

Chocolat

Drawing on her own childhood memories of life in colonial Cameroon, Claire Denis’s engrossing first feature tells the story of a friendship between a white girl, France, and a native Cameroonian, Protee, whom her parents hired as household help. Returned to Cameroon to exhume her past, twenty-something France chaperones us into a gorgeous, sensual and deeply lyrical memoir.

Too Late to Die Young [+see also:
film review
trailer
film profile
]

If the name of Chilean prodigy Dominga Sotomayor has escaped your radars, jot it down at once. Having nabbed the top award at the 2012 International Film Festival Rotterdam with her debut feature Thursday Till Sunday, she went on to win a Best Director award in Locarno for her 2018 Too Late to Die Young. A heartrending coming of age set in a rural commune nearby Santiago in 1990s Chile, this is as much an elegy to teenage angst and freedom as it is a portrait of a country venturing into adulthood, captured in the midst of its post-Pinochet transition.

Godless [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Ralitza Petrova
film profile
]

Bulgarian Ralitza Petrova’s assured debut feature Godless delves into the world of her home country’s less fortunate, following a nurse who traffics the ID cards of her patients in exchange for quick cash. A raw, unflinching portrait of life in the New East, drenched in that gritty aesthetic now synonymous with post-soviet social realism, Godless is tour de force permeated with despair, but there’s plenty in it to suggest a promising future for Bulgarian cinema: in 2016, Godless earned Petrova the Golden Leopard at the 69th Locarno Film Festival.

Anishoara [+see also:
film review
trailer
film profile
]

Moldovan Ana-Felicia Scutelnicu sets a coming-of-age tale in an unnamed, ancient-looking village from her homeland, a world seemingly devoid of adults and populated almost exclusively by children and elderly. In it, 15-year-old Anishoara struggles to make ends meet while grappling with the pangs of first love. A film that feels and looks like a time capsule, Anishoara doubles as a tribute to a dying way of life, and a lyrical testament to the mysteries of adolescence.

(The article continues below - Commercial information)

Did you enjoy reading this article? Please subscribe to our newsletter to receive more stories like this directly in your inbox.

Privacy Policy